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who founded a group, survivors in action, and from the miami school of law, who helped to draft online legislation. mary ann, if you don't know a victim or haven't been victimized in this way, it's hard to understand the severity of this. set this up for us. what kind of things are you seeing in these harassing relationships? >> we're seeing people taking the most intimate images, moments shared between these two people, and having this person threaten to use these images against the other person. you're having someone thinking of leaving an abusive relationship. and her partner says you do, i'm going to send these pictures to your parents, to all of your friends, to your boss, and i'm going to upload them to one of these websites where thousands of people will be able to see you. so we're talking about women with the possibility that someone is going to destroy their lives. it was possible before the internet, but it's easier now, so for someone with a click of a button to be able to put into use a threat to destroy your reputation, your intimate relationships that you have, to leave
to the economy but tea party republicans wanted to get rid of the health care law. >>> the president will name jay johnson as new head of homeland homeland security. if he is confirmed he will replace janet napolitano. >>> gunmen killed 67 people in westgate mall in nairobi. video captures the first days of the siege. that is it from al jazeera america, you can get us online at aljazeera.com. >>> the u.s. government back to work after a 16-day shut down, d.c. looks for a path forward. "consider this," the government what? how does the republican party heal itself? what's next for obamacare, and are there any rewinners from the whole mess? after wikileaks released a massive amount of information on the web. what has changed. julian assange is holed up. >>> the author of a new book tells us why cookies to comfortable chairs could cause humans worlds of trouble. hello. welcome to "consider this." we begin with the debt ceiling. the government open for business thursday after a 16-day shutdown, but as courteney healey reports the fight over government spending and obamacare is far from over. >> re
. as time goes on and the disastrous effects of this law beyond the glitches in the obamacare website. if you get down to the economics of this law takes a toll on the american people. >> i think they're going to respect the tee party for taking a hard-line stance and not using their pain and suffering under this law for political gain. >> to your point, though, the question is whether the tea party did shoot themselves in the foot because in effect the polls are blaming the gop disproportionately for the shutdown of the government for risking default and you have the whole issue that the shutdown and the debt ceiling debate sucked up all the media oxygen at a time when obamacare, which you oppose so strongly, the rollout has been by most accounts pretty close to a disaster. >> that's a telltale sign of more things to come as we get closer to the 2014 elections. >> didn't you lose focus by doing all this instead of focusing on something you opposed so strongly? >> absolutely not. we wanted to take care of this law and fight the principal battle and nip it in the bud before it had disa
's health care law. the white house says president obama will nominate jay johnson as the next head of the department of homeland security friday afternoon. if confirmed john condition will replace the former secretary. he served as a counter terrorism adviser during president obama's first term. news footage reveals more of what happened inside kenya's west gate mall the video captures the their identifying moments at the start of four-day siege that took place last month. 72 people died during that attack. those are the headlines, "america tonight" is up next on al jazerra. have a great evening. >> on america tonight. the price of politics. winners, losers and how ordinary americans shoulder the cost. if. >> i didn't win anything out of this. i lost, i lost time. i lost money. >> also tonight, continuing the series on the hacktivists, anonymous and other activists behind the digital mass and a death with dignity. vermont's new law and how it could redefine who makes that final decision. >> i don't fear death at all. life is what's hard. >> good evening, thanks for being with us. i
, anonymous and other activists behind the digital mass and a death with dignity. vermont's new law and how it could redefine who makes that final decision. >> i don't fear death at all. life is what's hard. >> good evening, thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. it is over except for blaij and the shaming. fowsefocused on the win and the, the truth is the shutdown hurt both the nation's economy and the economy of ordinary americans. big picture now. the total loss to the economy $24 billion. standard & poor's another number for us, $4.8 billion is what's cost lost economic output. the loss the government produced, because of the shutdown, higher interest rates, which will add another $114 million to the federal debt. and then there is the cost to the personal economies of ordinary americans. shopkeepers, to people worried about the future, care for kids with no childcare and government workers, who don't get a paycheck from the government exactly. but who rely on the government. he works for a government institution, and he represents a big part of the american workforce left with a lot
. >> the supreme law of the land. the greatest governing document the world has ever known. >> i carry a copy. >> just look at your constitution. which i keep in my pocket. somewhere deep inside my pocket. but i guarantee you it is in here. >> jon: hold on, hold on. i have got -- wait, that is my weed. i got my weed. i got a couple of rubbers here. ah. son of a bitch that's the monitor lizard i use to guard my copy of the constitution. i think i got some band-aids in there, son of a bitch, he bit me again! but you know what? perhaps we can look to the constitution for a solution to this crisis. let me get mine. son of a bitch! >> all right. here we go. all right. so in 2009 congress passed the affordable care act, were they allowed to do that? >> congress may determine the time of -- isn't there a cartoon that explains this? >> yes, i -- if they vote for me on capitol hill, well, then, i am off to the white house, where i wait in a line with a lot of other bills for the president to sign. and if he signs me then i will be a law! >> jon: you know what i just realized, one of those bills i thi
to do whatever it takes to overhaul his signature health care law. >>> newly published documents reveal close ties between the national security agency and the cia when it comes to drones. former nsa edward snowden shows how closely they cooperate. the world health organization says it considers air pollution a leading cause of cancer. it is the first time dirty air has been labeled a carcinogen. dirty air joins other products such as abs, tobacco and u uv radiation. you can get the latest news on aljazeera.com. >> i don't fear death at all. death is easy, life is hard. >> good evening and thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. it's over now, all over but for the blaming and shaming. in washington much of the focus wan on the win-loss column and a lot of political spin but truth ask often told in numbers. the truth is the shutdown hurt but the nation's economy and the economy of ordinary americans. big picture now, the total loss to the economy, $24 billion, at standard & poor's, another number for us, 4.8 billion is what's called lost economic output. the cost the government continue
national book festival on the national mall in washington, d.c., harvard university law professor kenneth mack presents his book "representing the race: the creation of the civil rightsr lawyer." kennet >> thank you. thank you to the library of congress for inviting me. and thank you to all of you for coming. what i would like to do today is talk a little bit about the bitt book, lived about how i came to little bit write it and i'll be just ae to little bit also. and then we will tak e questions. will take questions. so the book, the book is a biographical account of men and women to change america, men and women who helped transform america from a country that denied basic citizenship rights to a portion of its citizens based on race to the country we know today that embraces racial equality as one of its core principles. is a collective biography of african-americans who practiced law during the era of jim crow. lawyers like thurgood marshall and lesser known figures like los angeles lawyer lloyd miller, paul e. murray spent a career in washington d.c. alexander in philadelphia and a
administration has not come through a more transparent government. an obscure 1917 law to enable felony progressions for six government employees for leak being classified information to the press, compared to all previous administrations combined. let's talk about the general move away from reporting from newspapers and tv and networks. throughout my career, investigations seem to ebb and flow. the investigative teams, and a lot of it seems 20 depend on the economy, but right now, it feels different, it feels like a more permanent shift. >> i think that's right. it was created five years ago because what has gone on, as the business price of the press has accelerated, almost in every case, and there are a couple of exceptions and the new york times is a notable exception, but with a few exceptions, people have systematically cut back. investigative reporting is risky and doesn't always yield stories, it makes enemies, it's not commercial, and it's impossible to turn a profit into such, and that's why phil's operation is a non-profit and that's why ours is as well and depends on donors,
. this is the spokesperson for them. >> you are supposed to use the law to protect people, and not to just use the law to protect some people, but almost everybody now it has come back that the sex worker has to pay for the police. you just have to pay, and they will protect you. >> anti-discrimination laws in thailand are nonx-existent or weak at best, and those laws have to be strengthened or developed in the first place. >> one way or another, bruce lasky will do what he can to defend the sex workers or those who need legal help. he moved to asia from new york with ambitions and some say a starry-eyed notion of helping the lowest of the low, and anyone else who lacks access to justice. he calls his organization bridges across borders southeast asia. >> i think that i was ignorant, and this is a good thing. i did not realize the odds i was up against. >> susan has worked with him and she is an associate dean at the drexel law school in philadelphia. >> he is a risk-taker, and very compassionate person. he's an idealist, i think. >> it is untsable that there were skeptics when lasky set out to have a
of rutgers law school, and i think that, unfortunately, rutgers' reputation was dragged through the mud. it was headline after headline. if i were governor, i would have had them all in my office, we would have settled it from the get go, and it wouldn't have gone on for as long as it has. but barci has shown the lack of -- a leader? no, he's the opposite of a brilliant leader. this is a man who has fallen down on the job time and time again and, unfortunately, rutgers' reputation has suffered and, hopefully, that's just in the short term. >> moderator: governor, 30 seconds. christie: listen, the fact is very simple. when bob barci had an athletic director who he put in charge of supervising in this coach, he left it to the athletic director to handle it. it's called delegation of responsibility. and president barci relied upon the athletic director's judgment, the director made a judgment, and when that judgment was proven to be wrong, that athletic director resigned, and the coach was terminated. and now we've moved forward. by the way, i think julie herman's going to be an outstandin
justice system. and it's also led to a loss of democracy in constitutional law and i--i think that judges have a lot of responsibility for all these problems that we face today. c-span: you name a lot of judges, and you talk about them in the book. >> guest: right. c-span: i'm just gonna pull one out here from chapter 5... >> guest: sure. c-span: ... judge norma shapiro. >> guest: well, judge shapiro is--is a federal judge in philadelphia, and she has been basically presiding over the philadelphia prisons ever since a consent decree was signed some decades ago over allegedly unconstitutional conditions in the prisons. and what she did, as a result of this consent decree, was to institute a cap on prison population. and what this means is that when prison population hits an x figure, inmates automatically start getting released. and what this also means is that she's basically forced the local judges to release a lot of--a lot of defendants in pretrial proceedings, not give jail time to a lot of people who really ought to be in jail. and this has had disastrous consequences. it's basically
investigation, there's no shield law. >> which could be very arbitrary, in fact, in the district. you could get a subpoena issued by the superior court and have great protection and the free flow of information act which is a good shield law if it's issued literally across the street from the federal courthouse, you're looking at testifying or going to jail. a very arbitrary situation we have today. >> yes, it is. even though the justice department guidelines have been strengthened, a lot of changes made to them, you still generally have this intent involved because there is enough of a leeway there for attorney generals' decision making and the national security exemption that they can still by in large do what they want to do. >> guidelines are, in fact, guidelines. they can be followed or not followed. not enforceable by a reporter. you can't say to a court the subpoena needs to be quashed. having a shield law seems to me would be a step forward. >> would be. journalists will protect their sources. a shield law will help them do that. a shield law will probably help most journalists who work
rights law. when did human rights laws start part of the discussion on the slave trade? >> really around the turn of the 19th century. it's interesting. people think that international human right law is a product of the 120th century. many most of the conventional account people say it was after world war ii. the holocaust happened, news of that came out a bunch of things happened after world war ii. this was the trial of the nazi war krill. similar trial in the far east. the u.n. was founded, universal declaration of human rights. everyone said it's when international law started to look at human rights issues. in my book, i say no it was earlier. it was in connection with with the slave trade. in the early 19th century starting in 18 -- britain was another -- and began to spread throughout the countries that had been engaged in the slave trade. this is no longer a practice they wanted to participate in. it was perceived as violating natural rights. same idea of rights that underpin the u.s. revolution and the revolution in france. the declaration of independence. we hold the truths to
detention facility in the state. she says everyone night is there for a violation of civil not criminal laws. that locking them up when they pose no threat makes no sense. >> we should be releasing people who pose, you know, no risk to communities, who aren't a security risk. who have equities here, rather than rounding up more and more people. >> cheryl arranged for us to meet one of her clients who was recently released. she lives over an hour's drive from miami. >> this is ahomestead, florida, a large mexican population south of miami, she was going to the broward detention center for six months. >> alejandra, not her real name, had had years of abuse from her husband. she hoped to have asylum in the united states. a few months after arriving alejandra was on the bus when she was stopped by immigration officials. >> they didn't ask for everyone's papers? >> no, no [ spanish ] >> she was hand cuftd and spent a couple of nights at the local jail before being transferre transferred to broward. [ spanish ] >> alejandra is still fighting her immigration case. she is one of the lucky few to get
al qaeda, we are crazy as a nation not to use the law of war to gather intelligence. i am not for torturing anyone. i have been a military lawyer for 31 years. i believe in the geneva convention. i believe that my country is special. i believe in the international regimes about how you interrogate prisoners who you hold. i know what al qaeda does to their prisoners. i do not want to be like them. i want -- i want to be the united states, but the united states has a right under the law of war to gather intelligence. the last thing a member of al qaeda should hear when they're captured is "you have a right to remain silent. here's your lawyer." i don't want them to remain silent. i want them over time to provide us with whatever intelligence is available. why was he moved off the ship? apparently he had a medical condition that could not be treated on the naval vessel. i believe in providing quality health care to prisoners of war simply because i want that standard to be available to our soldiers in future wars. the standard we set today could follow us into the next war,
the children right away and law enforcement from all over the region has come into town and they are helping out. they basically shut everything down. >> we can see from some of the images here how quickly law enforcement officials dexrended on the scene there. martha, thanks very much. we are expecting a press briefing in the hour from authorities there. we'll bring you any new information as soon as we get it here "news nation" also following the vow to fix the problems plaguing the healthcare.gov website. the president said, quote, there is no excuse. so, some of the people that were around the president in the sound bite i wanted to show you there, included people that have been suffering from health conditions that haven't been able to have proper insurance in the past. now the president also said that there vk nearly 20 million visit to the website so far and half a million people applied for coverage. officials have not announced how many people enrolled and republican reaction was swift, even before the president was finished speaking. ted cruz issued a statement saying, president ob
was a salesman in chief talking about the attributes of obamacare law, talking once again about preexisting conditions you captain be secluded, you can get your preventive care for free, you can stay on your parents plan until you're 26. he ultimately signed that bill some three years ago, and perhaps it's indicative of the problems and issues surrounding this issue, the president still has to do that very much on defense. but at the same time the president at this point no sense talking about the overwhelming demand and interest on the website. they do say some 19 million americans have looked at it and attributing all the problems the website has had to simply volume. it goes much deeper at this point and the white house is certainly admitting that much. you heard the president say that in the rose garden just a few moments ago. >> the problem has been that the website that's supposed to make it easy to apply for and purchase the insurance is not work being the -- working the wait it should be. there's no sugar coating that. people have gotten stuck during the application process and i th
by phone. that's different. the president will certainly make the case that the health care law is about more than just botched, at least at this point, a flawed website, it's about affordable health care. they will point out among other things that 50% more agents are available at call centers to help people that want to apply right now. among the things that critics of health care website and of the health care plan in general will indicate is the fact that the white house still will not say exactly how many people have enrolled to this point. they point to the number 19 million unique visitors to date over the last three weeks but comparatively that's not that big when you compare it to other websites, maybe ranks like 200 or 250th of all the websites that are out there right now. the president will do his best to look forward, not look to the past. over the next several days expect to see cabinet members and other top officials of this white house spreading out over the country trying to make the case for themselves, particularly among people in areas with high populations of the uni
records law and we mitigate. it's a very powerful tool and we have used it successfully from us for years or are they compelled to testify it was a bunch of people pleading the fifth? >> there will be a lot of paperwork about what they look for and it's a tedious process. but it's the one that is available to us and for years and years, it has reproduced tons of records on the government has been forced to produce records to us that we have made use of an exposed the operation of government to the public and we are part of that. >> in a perfect scenario, what would be just as? howell justice look in the situation when it's all said and done? >> the obama administration used the irs in an aggressive way to suppress the activities of the tea party groups. it is beyond question. there is hard enough documentation on the record. including who made the decisions and who ordered this. there has to be accountability from the administration as to hew to use the irs as a political weapon to guarantee a collection by the president of the united states. >> even if you connect those, you want every s
-month period. interventions were tried by the school and by the victim's mom to no avail. at that point, law enforcement had to step in, and that's why we made felony criminal charges, because if this can't be taken care of at home, certainly the system has an answer. >> now, obviously, we know that lots of kids around this age with social media and facebook and twitter and so on, they do tend to be pretty unplease tent to each other. where does it move from that to the severity of what has happened here, in other words, where there is a genuine risk that somebody may take their life? >> well, they were saying stuff like go kill yourself, go drink bleach and die and this was just what was online. the 14-year-old victim actually over this period of ten months calls the 12-year-old suspect to fight our victim rebecca. so it was physical taunting. it was -- they terrorized her, they intimidated her, and it was a long-standing feud, if you will, that wouldn't stop. so as a result, we had to do something because obviously, our suspect, who was 14 and our victim who was 12 was -- were constantly a
at today's top stories. same-sex marriage is now the law of the land in new jersey. only moments ago we learned that governor chris christie has dropped his legal opposition to the issue. >> i declare joseph and orville to be lawful spouses in the state of new jersey. [ cheering ] >> mayor corey booker doing the honors just after midnight. the first same-sex couples to tie the not at newark's city hallen funerals are being held in baghdad for victims of a deadly suicide-bomb attacks. 55 people were killed when an explosive ripped through a busy cafe through the compan capitoln under. it was one of six bombings on the day. >>> one of china's biggest cities totally shut down by choking smog. students are being kept home from school and business versus been shuttered just days ago the "world health organization" declared pollution to be a significant cause of cancer. >>> president obama with a speech on the affordable care act. we'll bring you that speech live from the rose garden. "consider this" is next. [ ♪ theme ] >> the u.s. government opened for business again after a shutdown. dc
? when you have a situation where the minister is saying, they are just applying the law and enforcing the law. that is just his justification. >> he is not the one who made the law. >> you think his justification holds? that is not what the education minister thinks. >> that is not what i meant. things should have been done differently. he announced yesterday he wanted to reassure all of the socialist because a lot of them criticized him when leonardo was deported days ago. the prime minister asked for it two days ago. just until we have all the elements and until it is finished, we should not just accuse him like it has been done. >> there is one element i want to highlight here. to hear her speaking french, she is a poster child for what many accuse the people of not being. >> yes. of course. every situation is different. it is nonsense to say all these people do not want to integrate into the country. yes. there are people who do integrate and do go to school and succeed in school. so that is exactly an example of how school is the best way to integrate in the country and the best
and by the victim's mom to no avail. at that point, law enforcement had to step in, and that's why we made felony criminal charges, because if this can't be taken care of at home, certainly the system has an answer. >> now, obviously, we know that lots of kids around this age with social media and facebook and twitter and so on, they do tend to be pretty unplease tent to each other. where does it move from that to the severity of what has happened here, in other words, where there is a genuine risk that somebody may take their life? >> well, they were saying stuff like go kill yourself, go drink bleach and die and this was just what was online. the 14-year-old victim actually over this period of ten months calls the 12-year-old suspect to fight our victim rebecca. so it was physical taunting. it was -- they terrorized her, they intimidated her, and it was a long-standing feud, if you will, that wouldn't stop. so as a result, we had to do something because obviously, our suspect, who was 14 and our victim who was 12 was -- were constantly at each other but most importantly, our victim was beat dow
ladies. find out more. >> coming up, president obama on problems with the health care law website. then, a look at how the law is affecting insurance coverage. by the american association of the advancement of science on long term energy outlook. >> c-span student cam video competition asks what the most important issue congress should consider in 2014. be sure to include c-span video. a grand prize of $5,000. this year, we have doubled the number of winners and total five -- prizes. visitore information? student cam.org. you -- thomasne donahue spoke about the government shutdown and 2014 elections in remarks at the christian science monitor. you can see the him -- the event in its entirety at c-span.org. here is a look. >> i do not know senator chris. we are all getting to watching. i think about him as a tenant -- tennis player. of motion have a lot to the left and right. he has his right as a member of the senate to get out and push the things he supports and retract the things he does not support. we will try to work with them wherever we can. remember the issue. how youe results a
to understand is that section 26 is not all about university of missions. this is a much broader law that applies not just your race and ethnicity but also sex and other this is a broad-based law that was primarily motivated by the people of michigan's decision to move past the day when we always focus on race and exactly as greater invited the states to do you can -- you can see how that discussion gets mired when you look at some of these statistics that we have been talking about. is someone who has multiple racial boxes checked more or less diverse than someone who only has one box checked? is someone who comes from outside the country -- say from mexico -- >> you've done something much more. you are basically saying, because fisher and grutter -- we've always applied strict scrutiny -- >> correct. >> all right. so it's essentially a last resort, within some reason. but what you are saying, if all those other measures fail, you're by constitution saying you can't go to the remedy that might work. >> no, that's not what we are saying. >> well, but you're -- but this amendment is s
everywhere else in the state. >> there's a law out there for almost anything that we want to do. and one of the laws is the right to vote. and all we're trying to do today is see that the state government, you know, helps us enforce that law. we want the secretary of state to stand beside us and say this needs to be done. >> election officials say they don't have the budget to set up those sites. also at stake, the potential for native american voters to change election outcomes. this controversy reaches beyond montana to other states, south dakota, arizona, we're talking about some gangt -- significant reactions. wajahat ali, many native americans have to drive this far just to cast a ballot. >> they are very empathetic and outraged. turtle heart, said, many of the more remote indian reservations are without a car to reach apology places and -- polling places. especially in south dakota and alaska. it's persistent pernicious and adaptive. and kenji said native americans shouldn't have to be -- have to pay for their votes to be counted. throughout the show use the twitter hashtag, ajam
spoke on the floor for more than 20 consecutive hours about defunding the healthcare law. here's senator cruz's remarks from wednesday. >> mr. president, i rise today in opposition to the deal that the senate is getting ready to vote on. this is a terrible deal. this deal embodies everything about the washington establishment that frustrates the american people. this deal kicks the can down the road. it allows yet more debt, more deficits, more spending and it does absolutely nothing to provide relief for the millions of americans who are hurting because of obamacare. to all the young people right now coming out of school who can't find a job because of obamacare, this deal does nothing for them. to all of the single moms who are struggling and being forced into part-time work trying to feed their kids on 29 hours a week because of obamacare, this deal does nothing for them. to all of the hard-working families who are right now getting massive premium increases from their health insurance companies and trying to figure out how they're going to make ends meet with health insurance going u
. it was an exciting night and few more excited that newark mayor elect. >> i have to do this by law. [ laughter ] >> jon: is this one of those stop and frisk deals? is that what is happen something in what does he have to do by law? why is he even talking about the law? maybe i should just let him -- >> all right. so i have to do this by law and so before we exchange the vows, i must ask if there's anyone present here today that should know of any reason why joseph and orville should not be marriaged -- married, speak now or forever hold your peace. >> jon: in new jersey that is the law. you are required by law to ask if anyone objects to a wedding. not just weddings in new jersey you have to do that for everything. it's part of the state's you got a problem with that act 1794. at any bar in new jersey at some point during the night, somebody looks at you and says do you have a problem with that? they don't want to fight they are obeying the law. time for the special moment they've been waiting for all their lives. >> do you wish to be joined in marriage. >> yes. yes. >> yes. >> and i wish to j
. -- it is state-by-state. there is not any shield law. >> in the district, if you get subpoenaed a you have great protection because of the freedom of information act. if it is issued across the street from the federal courthouse tom a you are looking at testifying are going to jail. it is an arbitrary situation. what even though the justice department guidelines are greatly strengthened and there are technical changes made, you still generally have intent involved. there is leeway there for the attorney general decision-making that they can still buy a large do what they want to do. >> at the end of the day, guidelines can be followed or not followed. it is not enforceable by reporters. you cannot say the subpoena needs to be -- because it did not follow the guidelines. it shows law would be a step forward. there's a shield law would be a stone fort. law would be a step forward. it is difficult to define. >> i look at this from the international perspective, not the u.s. perspective. i looked at in the context of how radically technology has changed how journalism is conducted. is a pragmatic ar
are doing everything we can to fulfill that responsibility. that means that our entire government, law enforcement, and homeland security professionals, troops, diplomats, intelligence personnel are all working together. it means working with state and local partners to disrupt terrorist attacks and make our borders more secure and respond to national his asters and make our immigration system more affect if and fair. addressing any one of these challenges is a tall order. addressing all of them at once is a monumental task. that is what the dedicated men and women of the department of homeland security do every day. i am proud to announce my choice to lead them. an astounding public servant who i have known and trusted for years, mr. jeh johnson. toare enormously grateful secretary janet napolitano. she could not be here today. she has made her move to her new position in sunny california, overseeing the entire education system in that great state. i know she will do an outstanding job there with that incredible young people that are in our largest state. we all deeply appreciate that
to the university of virginia law school. he studied law, did not like it so much, but after a year to the move down to the atlantic, opened a law office and was really a terrible lawyer. in his year or two down there he attained no clients. he loved spending the afternoons reading. he read a lot of history. he created new discipline in this country, political science. he read a lot about politics, government, economics, history, and how they were melded into this new thing called political science. and after wilson realized he was not making a living as an attorney in atlanta he decided he was going to go to graduate school. one very good thing came out of his atlanta years and that was he had one big piece of business as a lawyer, and that was something that his family had thrown to him. there was some piece of property that needed some contracts done, legal work. so he went to georgia where he was tying up loose ends and where he, a presbyterian ministers son met a woman named ellen lou erickson who was a presbyterian ministers daughter. the two of them fell in love and had a real old-fashioned 1
if they are against the government. i think we need to look at the laws that are in place that allow our government to be hijacked by a few who are not looking at the bigger picture. i just think we need to step back and take a look at the gerrymandering. the people don't trust us and we did it to ourselves. thank you. this is final passage on the senate floor. she talked a bit about the health care law. art of it when asked for income verification for those who are getting health care subsidies. there is also another piece that would require the health and human services inspector general to report back to congress on a number of issues of the affordable care act of the health care law. this is robert. just to let you know, once this wraps up, we are expecting the house to gavel when at some point. we do not have a time. we will have it live for you on c-span when it starts. hello to robert. caller: good evening. i do not vote democratic or republican. people who vote straight ticket and stick by it. i was going listen to the people and vote for who i think is going to service test. in aody gets e
comment about that. i'm also antimurder and i put a lot of murderers away, too. i follow the law. >> that was phil klein. the former republican attorney general for the great state of kansas and he was not in that courthouse that day to put away a murderer. he was there because he was on trial. he had been holed up on ethics charges for professional misconduct. and that drama came to an end today when the kansas supreme court finally took away his license to practice law. they took his license and he was the attorney general of that state. the real drama in this case has always been that this phil klein event has been taking place against the backdrop of just incredible violence in kansas. in 1993, this woman walked up to a kansas doctor and she shot him. shot him through both of his arms. he had been attacked before. his clinic had been fire bombed, but in 1993. they shot him. he came back to work the next day bandaged up. he said he thought it was important to show his face, that he would not be intimidated. the woman who shot him went to prison for shooting him in 1993, but th
to sign a law that defunds the signature legislate. >> to put you in the conservative mind set they look at the roll out and they think come january and february we could get a delay of the individual mandate. this is how conservatives are strat jazzi i-- strategizing ri. >> they might be supportive of some ting tinkering but they ar committed to not negotiating when there is a shut down or threat of default. they think there is is a template you have to set in which you don't negotiate in the situation. >> you have such great sources on the republican side. all sides in fact. what is your sense within the senate and including the house dynamic with this since he crosses the building and goes over and tries to work with the house. where is he in terms of gyming something up? >> it's interesting when you see comments over the weekend and he is praising house republicans. because ted cruise working with house conservatives creates a problem once again. ted cruz will continue to huddle and raise expectations. >> what about those house republicans who saw that ted cruz couldn't actually deli
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